side with sb


side with sb
UK US side with sb
Phrasal Verb with side({{}}/saɪd/ verb
to decide that you support a particular opinion or belief in an argument: »

The judge sided with workers who were sacked for refusing to use unsafe equipment.

side with sb on sth »

The Republican administration tended to side with private interests on issues of government regulation.


Financial and business terms. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • side with — index concur (agree), conform, cooperate, espouse, involve (participate), join (associate oneself with) …   Law dictionary

  • side with — {v.} To agree with; help. * /Alan always sides with Johnny in an argument./ * /Gerald sided with the plan to move the club./ Contrast: SIDE AGAINST …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • side with — {v.} To agree with; help. * /Alan always sides with Johnny in an argument./ * /Gerald sided with the plan to move the club./ Contrast: SIDE AGAINST …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • side with — Synonyms and related words: accord, act with, advocate, agree, agree in opinion, agree with, align with, back, back up, backstop, champion, chime in with, close with, coincide, concur, conform to, ditto, echo, fall in with, flock to, get behind,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • side with — verb To choose to take the same point of view as (someone) …   Wiktionary

  • The Other Side With Steve Godfrey — Genre Talk show Running time 3 hours Country United States Home station KFYI Starring …   Wikipedia

  • work side by side with — index cooperate Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Side-By-Side (graphic) — Side By Side is a television graphic introduced by ESPN which allows the broadcast to show commercials and live sports simultaneously. Currently, it is largely associated with ESPN s telecasts of the Indy Racing League IndyCar Series and… …   Wikipedia

  • Side — Side, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Sided}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Siding}.] 1. To lean on one side. [Obs.] Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. To embrace the opinions of one party, or engage in its interest, in opposition to another party; to take sides; as, to side with …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • side — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sīde; akin to Old High German sīta side, Old English sīd ample, wide Date: before 12th century 1. a. the right or left part of the wall or trunk of the body < a pain in the side > b. (1) one of… …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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